Pakistan Jittery About Trump’s Islamic Radicalism Comment

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Islamabad: President Donald Trump’s inaugural speech promised “America first” policy, but offered no specifics about America’s place in the world.

The billionaire businessman and reality television star – the first president who had never held political office or high military rank – promised to stir a “new national pride” and protect America from the “ravages” of countries he says have stolen US jobs.

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“This American carnage stops right here,” Trump declared. In a warning to the world, he said, “From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this moment on, it’s going to be America first.”

A group of retired government officials gathered after morning prayers for a walk in a sprawling park in the heart of the federal capital of Islamabad and the topic of their conversation was President Trump’s inaugural speech.

They expressed concern that Trump would target the Islamic world, particularly Pakistan, because of his campaign rhetoric about Muslims as well as his inaugural speech in which he promised to eradicate Islamic terrorism worldwide. Pakistan has often been accused of harboring militant insurgents and declared terrorist groups that have targeted neighboring India, against whom Pakistan has fought three wars, as well as Afghanistan. Pakistan denies the charges.

“Likely there is more trouble in store for the Islamic world and our country will take the most brunt of the harsh treatment from President Trump administration,” said Mohammad Afzal.

His sentiments were echoed by Shafiq Khan, who said “the one main thing that the new president mentioned about the world outside America is to tackle Islamic radicalism and that should be the matter of concern for all of us.”

Amanaullah, a school teacher in Islamabad, feared Trump’s reference to eliminating radical Islamic terrorism. “I think under this name he wants to malign and eliminate Islam,” he said.

Umair Khan, an engineer, said of Trump: “Let him taste the burden of government and get settled, I am sure he will calm.”

People in Beijing expressed doubts on Saturday about President Donald Trump’s ability to steer the US economy and manage China-American relations, underscoring concerns over trade, Taiwan and other issues.

While Trump didn’t mention China in his inaugural address Friday, he referred often to the countryduring the campaign and upended diplomatic protocol after the election by speaking on the phone with the president of self-governing Taiwan, the island China considers its own territory.

Aaron Wang, who works for a logistics company, said he hoped for the best but was wary of Trump’s threat to disrupt commerce between the countries, including imposing a 45 percent tariff on Chinese imports.

 

 

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