Kailash Satyarthi ‘Pained By Theft Of Nobel Citation’

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New Delhi: Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi on Saturday said that he is pained at the theft of his Nobel citation and ornaments given to his wife by his mother as they were precious for the family.

He also said that the theft has strengthened his resolve to continue working for the cause of children and he hasn’t thought about hiring additional security.

“My wife and I came back today from our Latin America trip and we were pained to see the house lying scattered. When I had left, everything was safe. I felt that my Nobel replica and citation are lying safe with the people of my country in my home but the unfortunate incident happened,” he said.

A replica of the Nobel Peace Prize and its citation awarded to child rights activist Satyarthi were among the valuables stolen from his southeast Delhi residence in his absence on February 7.

It was during his dinner with the President of Panama, his wife and other dignitaries, including the Indian ambassador to Panama that he learnt of the theft.

“I was having a very intimate dinner with the president of Panama, his wife and other dignitaries when I got some messages and phone calls. I didn’t tell anyone because it’s not good to say that the national pride was stolen,” he recalled.

Satyarthi said that the thieves took away two of the most precious things that were very close to him and his family.

“My mother had collected all her savings and all her silver jewellery to gift a gold jewellery set to my wife on our wedding. I am the youngest in the family so she adored me and my wife.

“She is no more with us but that was something that we kept very carefully. We had bought a locker for keeping it,” he said.

The child rights activist also said that the theft of the citation was equally painful.

“It was the first citation to someone who has been working for children in their history. I am the only Indian citizen who has got it. I had given my Nobel Prize medal and that is safely kept in Rashtrapati Bhavan museum.

“But I had attachment with the citation so I didn’t give it. I had thought that my grandson, who is now two, will read it when he grows up. My wife thought that it’s invaluable and we had specially bought a locker for it but it was broken,” he lamented.