#Down2EarthWedding: Couple Goes For Eco-Friendly Wedding

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Mumbai: Deepa Kamath and Prashin Jagger tied the knot in a humble ceremony amid family members and friends using mostly recycled products, with an aim to contribute towards minimising the harmful impact on the environment.

Big fat Indian weddings are what we know mostly of, thanks to Karan Johar, but these days, several couples are steering away from the norm and are finding quirky and unusual ways to tie the knot. This time, it is a Mumbai couple who decided to make their D-Day special and they did so by going ‘minimalist’. How? Breaking conventional norms, Deepa Kamath and Prashin Jagger decided to have a simple wedding that was not only pocket-friendly but also environment-friendly. Yes, the duo tied the knot in a humble ceremony amid family members and friends using mostly recycled products, attempting to leave a lesser impact on environment.From decorations to cutlery used in the wedding, they chose alternatives trying to generate not just zero plastic waste but also opted products that were not made by harming the natural resources.The wedding invites were sent on WhatsApp or verbally, instead of using printed cards.
The main welcome board placed in front of the wedding venue was made from a cardboard box of a LED TV purchased by a friend. Besides, hand-made posters made of old papers and other items were used to decorate the venue.

“There is a lot of misunderstanding about what exactly is eco-friendly. Vendors argued that using tissue papers was justifiable as it is bio-degradable, not understanding that to make them thousands of trees are cut and it’s made from fresh pulp,” Jagger, a freelance photographer told Indian Express.

Convincing the vendors to use eco-friendly products for the wedding turned out to be the most tedious task, revealed Kamath. “It took us many meetings to convince them about what were the things we wanted to use and they tried to coax us to give in to the ongoing practice saying ‘log kya kahenge’ (what will people say),” she said.

Contrary to expectations, guests at the wedding were in fact happy and welcoming of the change.

Kamath, who is now learning Pali, stressed on how it was not just a theme wedding for them. “It is a way of life for us. We believe in bringing something to our home only when there is a real need than a perceived want,” she said.

For return-gifts for guests at the wedding, the couple sourced seed balls from a Pune-based NGO, wrapped inside cloth pouches made from scrap, and urged people to plant them wherever possible.

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