62nd Birth Anniversary Of Bangladeshi Filmmaker Tareque Masud

0
253

The 62nd birthday of the late Bangladeshi filmmaker, Tareque Masud. The first Bangladeshi director to participate in the Oscars or to be honored at Cannes, Tareque Masud was a driving force within his country’s independent film movement. He and his wife Catherine, would visit remote villages all over Bangladesh showing films with a mobile projector, earning the nickname “Cinema Feriwalla” (Vendor of Movies).

Born in the village of Nurpur on this day in 1956, Masud was educated in a Bangladeshi madrassa, or Muslim school. Following Bangladesh’s independence in 1971, he became part of the film society movement and earned a master’s degree in history from the University of Dhaka.

His first films were documentaries that told the story of his homeland, starting with 1989’s Adam Surat (Inner Strength) about the Bangladeshi painter Sheikh Mohammed Sultan. His classic 1995 feature-length documentary Muktir Gaan (Song of Freedom) about the independence movement in Bangladesh attracted huge audiences.

Masud’s upbringing in East Pakistan inspired his first feature, The Clay Bird. The Masuds invested all their savings into completing the film, which went on to win an International Critics’ award at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival.

A founding member of the Short Film Forum, an important platform for independent film, Masud also organized Bangladesh’s first International Short and Documentary Film Festival, which continues to this day. To further honor his legacy, the Tareq Masud Memorial Trust launched the Tareque Masud Short Film Competition, encouraging a new generation of Bengali filmmakers to follow in his footsteps.

Later this month in December, publisher Katha Prakash is going to launch “Cholochitra Kotha,” new book about Tareque Masud.

Edited by wife Catherine Masud, Proshoon Rahman, Belayet Mamun, and Aftab Hossain, the book is going to be published in partnership with the Tareque Masud Memorial Trust.

Tareque’s ideas about the role of cinema in society are elaborated on in the book that features a collection of his lectures and interviews.

Tareque’s wife, Catherine Masud said that, “Tareque was a visionary and a pioneer of Bangladeshi cinema; an inspiring figure for young people in his own country and beyond. Although he made films for the people of Bangladesh, his films also spoke to the world through their universal themes of tolerance, compassion, and justice.”

Masud’s upbringing in East Pakistan inspired his first feature, The Clay Bird. The Masuds invested all their savings into completing the film, which went on to win an International Critics’ award at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival.

Sharing her experence, she said that, every film was a new experience for the couple. They worked on “Muktir Gaan” in New York with “found footage” that they collected from all over the world. It was a completely different process of working.

She discussed how Tareque was highly imaginative and had the power to visualize and frame a story. He would say that 20% is the film-maker’s work; but 80% is “Ayojon” (arrangements) -how to get the team together to execute that vision.

“It’s like a war,” she said.“And we’re like generals commanding our troops.” Tareque would say if he could do anything else, he would do that instead, she said. But he was made for making films, which is a very hard job. Other artists can paint or write or take a picture when they are feeling low, but film-makers can’t just go out and make a film.

The couple had only finished the script for their next film “Kagojer Phul” when Tareque’s life was cut short in a tragic road accident. Catherine expressed her firm desire to finish the film but said she hasn’t found that work-chemistry with anyone else.

Tareque had a concept he called “Total Film-making.” From writing the film to distribution and exhibition- the film-maker see every step of the way.That is a concept Catherine feels we need to apply in Bangladesh.

A founding member of the Short Film Forum, an important platform for independent film, Masud also organized Bangladesh’s first International Short and Documentary Film Festival, which continues to this day. To further honor his legacy, the Tareq Masud Memorial Trust launched the Tareque Masud Short Film Competition, encouraging a new generation of Bengali filmmakers to follow in his footsteps.

-----
Previous articleIndia 4th Highest Emitter Of CO2
Next articleHow Do You Tackle Stress At Workplace